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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 782382, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/782382
Review Article

The Role of IL-1β in the Bone Loss during Rheumatic Diseases

1Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, Rheumatology Unit, University of L’Aquila, Delta 6 Building, 67100 L’Aquila, Italy
2Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila, Italy

Received 31 December 2014; Revised 15 February 2015; Accepted 4 March 2015

Academic Editor: Nina Ivanovska

Copyright © 2015 Piero Ruscitti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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