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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 873860, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/873860
Review Article

The Role of the Immune System in Triplet Repeat Expansion Diseases

Department of Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Noskowskiego 12/14, 61-704 Poznan, Poland

Received 6 June 2014; Revised 6 October 2014; Accepted 7 October 2014

Academic Editor: Gustavo Duarte Pimentel

Copyright © 2015 Marta Olejniczak et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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