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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 1851420, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1851420
Review Article

Role of Mitochondria-Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane in Inflammation-Mediated Metabolic Diseases

1Department of Biomedical Science, Graduate School, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Republic of Korea
2BK21 Plus KNU Biomedical Convergence Program, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Republic of Korea
3Leading-edge Research Center for Drug Discovery and Development for Diabetes and Metabolic Disease, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Republic of Korea
4Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Republic of Korea

Received 22 September 2016; Accepted 17 November 2016

Academic Editor: Helen C. Steel

Copyright © 2016 Themis Thoudam et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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