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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 2684098, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2684098
Research Article

Genetic Ablation of Soluble TNF Does Not Affect Lesion Size and Functional Recovery after Moderate Spinal Cord Injury in Mice

1Neurobiology Research, Institute of Molecular Medicine, J.B. Winsloewsvej 21, st, 5000 Odense C, Denmark
2Department of Diagnostics, Molecular Sleep Lab, Rigshospitalet, Nordre Ringvej 69, 2600 Glostrup, Denmark
3Department of Pathology, Department of Clinical Research, SDU Muscle Research Cluster, University of Southern Denmark, J.B. Winsloewsvej 15, 5000 Odense C, Denmark
4The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1095 NW 14th Terrace, Miami, FL 33136, USA
5Department of Neurology, Odense University Hospital, J.B. Winsloewsvej 4, 5000 Odense C, Denmark
6Brain Research-Inter-Disciplinary Guided Excellence (BRIDGE), Department of Clinical Research, 5000 Odense C, Denmark

Received 8 August 2016; Revised 24 October 2016; Accepted 3 November 2016

Academic Editor: Ana Raquel Santiago

Copyright © 2016 Ditte Gry Ellman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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