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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 2989548, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2989548
Review Article

M1 and M2 Functional Imprinting of Primary Microglia: Role of P2X7 Activation and miR-125b

1CNR-Institute of Cell Biology and Neurobiology, Via del Fosso di Fiorano 65, 00143 Rome, Italy
2Fondazione Santa Lucia, Via del Fosso di Fiorano 65, 00143 Rome, Italy
3Inflammation and Experimental Surgery Unit, CIBERehd, Biomedical Research Institute of Murcia (IMIB-Arrixaca), Clinical University Hospital Virgen de la Arrixaca, 30120 Murcia, Spain

Received 23 September 2016; Accepted 24 November 2016

Academic Editor: Joana Gonçalves

Copyright © 2016 Chiara Parisi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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