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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 4062829, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4062829
Review Article

A Pathophysiological Insight into Sepsis and Its Correlation with Postmortem Diagnosis

Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Forensic Pathology, Ospedale Colonnello D’Avanzo, University of Foggia, Viale degli Aviatori 1, 71100 Foggia, Italy

Received 23 December 2015; Revised 21 March 2016; Accepted 10 April 2016

Academic Editor: Dianne Cooper

Copyright © 2016 C. Pomara et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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