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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 4375120, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4375120
Review Article

Parallel Aspects of the Microenvironment in Cancer and Autoimmune Disease

Immunology Research Laboratory, Carmel Medical Center, and Ruth and Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, 3436212 Haifa, Israel

Received 26 October 2015; Accepted 13 January 2016

Academic Editor: Simi Ali

Copyright © 2016 Michal A. Rahat and Jivan Shakya. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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