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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 4549676, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4549676
Review Article

Macrophages: Regulators of the Inflammatory Microenvironment during Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer

1Microbiology, Immunology and Cancer Biology Graduate Program, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
2Department of Lab Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
3Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA

Received 13 November 2015; Accepted 21 December 2015

Academic Editor: Seth B. Coffelt

Copyright © 2016 Nicholas J. Brady et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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