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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 5168363, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5168363
Research Article

Frequency of TNFA, INFG, and IL10 Gene Polymorphisms and Their Association with Malaria Vivax and Genomic Ancestry

1Department of Dermatologic, Infectious, and Parasitic Diseases, College of Medicine of São José do Rio Preto, São José do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil
2University Center of Rio Preto, UNIRP, São José do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil
3Laboratory of Tropical Diseases–Prof. Luiz Jacintho da Silva, Department of Genetics, Evolution and Bioagents, University of Campinas, Campinas, SP, Brazil
4Department of Biology, São Paulo State University, São José do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil
5Laboratory of Human and Medical Genetics, Federal University of Pará, Belém, PA, Brazil
6Laboratory of Basic Research in Malaria, Section of Parasitology, Evandro Chagas Institute, Belém, PA, Brazil

Received 29 February 2016; Revised 14 July 2016; Accepted 27 September 2016

Academic Editor: Luca Cantarini

Copyright © 2016 Adriana Antônia da Cruz Furini et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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