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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 5802973, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5802973
Research Article

Indoxyl Sulfate Induces Mesangial Cell Proliferation via the Induction of COX-2

1Department of Nephrology, Nanjing Children’s Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China
2Institute of Pediatrics, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China
3Nanjing Key Laboratory of Pediatrics, Nanjing Children’s Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

Received 10 August 2016; Accepted 27 September 2016

Academic Editor: Vinod K. Mishra

Copyright © 2016 Shuzhen Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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