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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 6591703, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6591703
Review Article

Epigenetic Control of Macrophage Polarisation and Soluble Mediator Gene Expression during Inflammation

Sir William Dunn school of Pathology, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RE, UK

Received 18 February 2016; Accepted 28 March 2016

Academic Editor: Eduardo López-Collazo

Copyright © 2016 Theodore S. Kapellos and Asif J. Iqbal. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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