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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 6813016, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6813016
Review Article

Endothelial Dysfunction and Inflammation: Immunity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Anhui Medical University, Key Laboratory of Anti-Inflammatory and Immune Medicine, Ministry of Education, Hefei 230032, China

Received 18 November 2015; Revised 9 March 2016; Accepted 17 March 2016

Academic Editor: Alex Kleinjan

Copyright © 2016 XueZhi Yang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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