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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 6985903, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6985903
Research Article

Differential Expression of Inflammation-Related Genes in Children with Down Syndrome

1Unit of Research in Genetics and Molecular Biology (UPGEM), Department of Molecular Biology, Medical School of São José do Rio Preto (FAMERP), 15090-000 São José do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil
2Department of Genetics, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil
3Center for Medical Genomics at HCFMRP/USP, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil
4Regional Blood of Ribeirão Preto at HCFMRP/USP, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil
5Institute of Bioinformatics and Biotechnology (2bio), Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil
6Metrópole Digital Institute (IMD), UFRN, Natal, RN, Brazil

Received 9 March 2016; Accepted 5 April 2016

Academic Editor: Ulrich Eisel

Copyright © 2016 Cláudia Regina Santos Silva et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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