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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 7314016, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7314016
Review Article

The Roles of Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells in Tumor Microenvironment Associated with Inflammation

1Laboratory for Experimental Hematology and Stem Cells, Institute for Medical Research, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotića 4, P.O. Box 102, 11129 Belgrade, Serbia
2Laboratorio de Bionanotecnologia, Universidad Bernardo O Higgins, General Gana 1780, 8370854 Santiago, Chile

Received 1 June 2016; Revised 15 July 2016; Accepted 27 July 2016

Academic Editor: Mirella Giovarelli

Copyright © 2016 Drenka Trivanović et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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