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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 7650260, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7650260
Review Article

Cellular Barriers after Extravasation: Leukocyte Interactions with Polarized Epithelia in the Inflamed Tissue

1Centro de Biología Molecular Severo Ochoa, CSIC-UAM, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, Spain
2William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London, EC1M 6BQ, UK

Received 10 November 2015; Accepted 5 January 2016

Academic Editor: Jaap D. van Buul

Copyright © 2016 Natalia Reglero-Real et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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