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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 7941684, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7941684
Research Article

Periploca forrestii Saponin Ameliorates Murine CFA-Induced Arthritis by Suppressing Cytokine Production

1Biotechnology College, Guilin Medical University, No. 109 North 2nd Huan Cheng Road, Guilin, Guangxi 541004, China
2Pharmaceutical College, Guilin Medical University, No. 109 North 2nd Huan Cheng Road, Guilin, Guangxi 541004, China

Received 21 May 2016; Accepted 7 August 2016

Academic Editor: Nona Janikashvili

Copyright © 2016 Yingqin Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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