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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 8249476, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8249476
Research Article

Myeloperoxidase-Oxidized LDLs Enhance an Anti-Inflammatory M2 and Antioxidant Phenotype in Murine Macrophages

1URBC-Narilis, University of Namur, 61 rue de Bruxelles, 5000 Namur, Belgium
2UMBD, University of Namur, 61 rue de Bruxelles, 5000 Namur, Belgium
3Laboratory of Experimental Medicine (ULB 222 Unit), Université Libre de Bruxelles, CHU-Charleroi, ISPPC Hôpital Vésale, Montigny-Le-Tilleul, Belgium
4Therapeutic Chemistry, ULB (Campus de la Plaine) CP205/05, boulevard du Triomphe, Brussels, Belgium

Received 25 April 2016; Revised 28 July 2016; Accepted 2 August 2016

Academic Editor: Michal A. Rahat

Copyright © 2016 Valérie Pireaux et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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