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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 8364279, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8364279
Research Article

N-Acetyl-L-cysteine Protects the Enterocyte against Oxidative Damage by Modulation of Mitochondrial Function

1Key Laboratory of Agro-Ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Observation and Experiment Station of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science in South-Central China, Ministry of Agriculture, Hunan Provincial Engineering Research Center for Healthy Livestock and Poultry Production, Changsha, Hunan 410125, China
2University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 10008, China
3Department of Microbiology, Molecular Genetics, and Immunology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA
4Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Macau, Macau
5College of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha, Hunan 410128, China
6Hunan Collaborative Innovation Center for Utilization of Botanical Functional Ingredients, Changsha, Hunan 410000, China

Received 30 June 2016; Revised 5 September 2016; Accepted 23 October 2016

Academic Editor: Michael Conlon

Copyright © 2016 Hao Xiao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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