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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 8413768, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8413768
Review Article

IL-32: A Novel Pluripotent Inflammatory Interleukin, towards Gastric Inflammation, Gastric Cancer, and Chronic Rhino Sinusitis

1Cell and Molecular Biology Lab, Department of Zoology, University of the Punjab, Lahore 54590, Pakistan
2Department of Zoology, Government College of Science, Wahdat Road, Lahore, Pakistan

Received 24 December 2015; Revised 23 February 2016; Accepted 20 March 2016

Academic Editor: Yona Keisari

Copyright © 2016 Muhammad Babar Khawar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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