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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2016, Article ID 8489251, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8489251
Review Article

Double Roles of Macrophages in Human Neuroimmune Diseases and Their Animal Models

1Department of Neurology and Neuroscience Center, First Hospital of Jilin University, Jilin University, Changchun 130021, China
2Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, 141 86 Stockholm, Sweden

Received 26 December 2015; Revised 21 February 2016; Accepted 23 February 2016

Academic Editor: Michal A. Rahat

Copyright © 2016 Xueli Fan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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