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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017, Article ID 1515389, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1515389
Research Article

Shear Stress Counteracts Endothelial CX3CL1 Induction and Monocytic Cell Adhesion

Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany

Correspondence should be addressed to Andreas Ludwig; ed.nehcaaku@giwdula

Received 13 January 2017; Accepted 23 February 2017; Published 26 March 2017

Academic Editor: Magdalena Riedl

Copyright © 2017 Aaron Babendreyer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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