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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 2401027, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2401027
Research Article

Stimulation of Alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Attenuates Nicotine-Induced Upregulation of MMP, MCP-1, and RANTES through Modulating ERK1/2/AP-1 Signaling Pathway in RAW264.7 and MOVAS Cells

1Department of Cardiology, Shanghai General Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China
2Department of Cardiology, Yancheng First People’s Hospital, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Nantong Medical University, Jiangsu, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Qiuyan Dai

Received 3 March 2017; Revised 4 September 2017; Accepted 27 September 2017; Published 16 November 2017

Academic Editor: Anshu Agrawal

Copyright © 2017 Liping Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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