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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017, Article ID 2608605, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2608605
Review Article

The Histone Modification Code in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases

1Department of Rheumatology and Applied Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama, Japan
2Project Research Division, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama, Japan

Correspondence should be addressed to Yasuto Araki; pj.ca.dem-amatias@ayikara

Received 21 October 2016; Accepted 8 December 2016; Published 3 January 2017

Academic Editor: Jin-Wen Xu

Copyright © 2017 Yasuto Araki and Toshihide Mimura. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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