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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 4049098, 22 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4049098
Review Article

Osteopontin at the Crossroads of Inflammation and Tumor Progression

1Department of Translational Medicine, University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara, Italy
2Department of Health Sciences and Interdisciplinary Research Center of Autoimmune Diseases (IRCAD), University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara, Italy
3SCDU Anestesia e Rianimazione, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Maggiore della Carità, Novara, Italy
4Department of Translational Medicine, Nephrology and Kidney Transplant Unit, University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara, Italy
5Department of Health Sciences, University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara, Italy
6Department of Surgery, University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara, Italy
7Anestesia e Rianimazione, Università “Magna Graecia” di Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Anna Aspesi; ti.opuinu.dem@isepsa.anna

Received 14 April 2017; Accepted 4 June 2017; Published 9 July 2017

Academic Editor: Rajesh Singh

Copyright © 2017 Luigi Mario Castello et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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