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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017, Article ID 4806541, 17 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4806541
Review Article

The Role of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate and Ceramide-1-Phosphate in Inflammation and Cancer

Division of Breast Surgery, Departments of Surgical Oncology and Molecular & Cellular Biology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Elm & Carlton Streets, Buffalo, NY 14263, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Nitai C. Hait; gro.krapllewsor@tiah.iatin

Received 31 May 2017; Revised 1 August 2017; Accepted 30 August 2017; Published 15 November 2017

Academic Editor: Alice Alessenko

Copyright © 2017 Nitai C. Hait and Aparna Maiti. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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