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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 5048616, 23 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5048616
Review Article

Neuropeptides and Microglial Activation in Inflammation, Pain, and Neurodegenerative Diseases

1INBIOMED (Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas), UBA-CONICET, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paraguay 2155, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina
2IFEC-CONICET, Depto. Farmacología, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba, Argentina

Correspondence should be addressed to Mercedes Lasaga; ra.abu.demf@agasalm

Received 19 September 2016; Revised 26 November 2016; Accepted 5 December 2016; Published 5 January 2017

Academic Editor: Marta Agudo-Barriuso

Copyright © 2017 Lila Carniglia et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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