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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017, Article ID 5095293, 17 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5095293
Review Article

Skin Immune Landscape: Inside and Outside the Organism

1Centre de Biophysique Moléculaire, CNRS UPR4301, Orléans, France
2Remedials Laboratoire, 91 rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré, 75008 Paris, France
3Collégium Sciences et Techniques, Université d’Orléans, Orléans, France

Correspondence should be addressed to Chantal Pichon; rf.snaelro-srnc@nohcip.latnahc

Received 5 May 2017; Revised 4 August 2017; Accepted 10 August 2017; Published 18 October 2017

Academic Editor: Danilo Pagliari

Copyright © 2017 Florence Abdallah et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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