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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017, Article ID 6825493, 16 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6825493
Review Article

HIV as a Cause of Immune Activation and Immunosenescence

1Department of Immunology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Institute for Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0001, South Africa
2South African Department of Science and Technology (DST)/National Research Foundation (NRF) Centre of Excellence in Epidemiological Modelling and Analysis (SACEMA), Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch 7600, South Africa

Correspondence should be addressed to T. M. Rossouw; az.ca.pu@wuossor.asereht

Received 30 June 2017; Revised 9 October 2017; Accepted 11 October 2017; Published 25 October 2017

Academic Editor: Carmela R. Balistreri

Copyright © 2017 T. Sokoya et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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