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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017, Article ID 7281986, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7281986
Research Article

ADAM19: A Novel Target for Metabolic Syndrome in Humans and Mice

1School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia
2Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Australia
3Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA
4South Texas Diabetes & Obesity Institute, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine, Brownsville, TX, USA
5Centre for Genetic Origins of Health & Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences, University of Western Australia and Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Western Australia, Australia

Correspondence should be addressed to Vance B. Matthews; ua.ude.awu@swehttam.ecnav

Received 13 October 2016; Accepted 12 January 2017; Published 7 February 2017

Academic Editor: Julio Galvez

Copyright © 2017 Lakshini Weerasekera et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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