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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017, Article ID 7685142, 19 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7685142
Review Article

S1P Lyase Regulation of Thymic Egress and Oncogenic Inflammatory Signaling

1Department of Biochemistry, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh 462020, India
2Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute and UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland, 5700 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Oakland, CA 94609, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Julie D. Saba; gro.irohc@abasj

Received 12 May 2017; Accepted 13 September 2017; Published 3 December 2017

Academic Editor: Alice Alessenko

Copyright © 2017 Ashok Kumar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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