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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2017, Article ID 9074601, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9074601
Review Article

The Role of Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase in Inflammatory Disorders of Gastrointestinal Tract

1Department of Ergonomics and Exercise Physiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Cracow, Poland
2Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Cracow, Poland
3Gastroenterology and Hepatology Clinic, The University Hospital, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Cracow, Poland

Correspondence should be addressed to Tomasz Brzozowski; lp.ude.rk-fyc@ozozrbpm

Received 1 July 2016; Accepted 26 January 2017; Published 21 February 2017

Academic Editor: Andrea E. Errasti

Copyright © 2017 Jan Bilski et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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