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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2018, Article ID 3972104, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/3972104
Research Article

Reduction of Glucocorticoid Receptor Function in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

1Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
2Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
3Institute of Cellular Medicine and NIHR Newcastle Biomedical Research Centre, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
4Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
5Newcastle Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
6Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

Correspondence should be addressed to Stuart Watson; ku.ca.lcn@nostaw.trauts

Received 11 January 2018; Revised 20 April 2018; Accepted 7 May 2018; Published 10 June 2018

Academic Editor: Ronald Gladue

Copyright © 2018 Megan Lynn et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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