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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2018, Article ID 5378284, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/5378284
Review Article

The Many Facets of Sphingolipids in the Specific Phases of Acute Inflammatory Response

1University Hospital Frankfurt, Instiute of Clinical Pharmacology, Frankfurt/Main, Germany
2Emanuel Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia
3Department of Pharmaceutical Science, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Elisabetta Albi; ti.gpinu@ibla.attebasile

Received 1 October 2017; Accepted 20 December 2017; Published 6 February 2018

Academic Editor: Vinod K. Mishra

Copyright © 2018 Sabine Grösch et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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