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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2018, Article ID 5823823, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/5823823
Review Article

Recent Advances in the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Pyroptosis in Sepsis

Department of Emergency Medicine, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Yu-Lei Gao; moc.621@828ieluyoag and Yan-Fen Chai; moc.621@2102nefnayiahc

Received 30 September 2017; Accepted 22 January 2018; Published 7 March 2018

Academic Editor: Soh Yamazaki

Copyright © 2018 Yu-Lei Gao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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