Mediators of Inflammation

Mediators of Inflammation / 2018 / Article

Comment on “Gut Microbiota as a Driver of Inflammation in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease”

  • Xia Li | Feng-Lai Yuan |
  •  Article ID 3746509 |
  •  Published 19 Jul 2018
  • | View Article

Response to: Comment on “Gut Microbiota as a Driver of Inflammation in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease”

  • Stefano Bibbò | Maria Pina Dore | Giovanni Cammarota |
  •  Article ID 7328057 |
  •  Published 19 Aug 2018

Letter to the Editor | Open Access

Volume 2018 |Article ID 7328057 | https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/7328057

Stefano Bibbò, Maria Pina Dore, Giovanni Cammarota, "Response to: Comment on “Gut Microbiota as a Driver of Inflammation in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease”", Mediators of Inflammation, vol. 2018, Article ID 7328057, 2 pages, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/7328057

Response to: Comment on “Gut Microbiota as a Driver of Inflammation in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease”

Academic Editor: Shin-ichi Yokota
Received27 Jun 2018
Accepted04 Jul 2018
Published19 Aug 2018

We would like to thank Li and Yuan for their insightful comments [1] on our article [2]. The authors focused on the role played by gut microbiota in the pathways of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and proposed that the modulation of intestinal dysbiosis may alter the progression of the disease. We agree with this suggestion; indeed, several studies reported the beneficial effect of gut microbiota modulation on NAFLD patients. Studies published in the last year demonstrated that the administration of multistrain probiotic mixtures improved clinical outcomes in overweight patients with NAFLD, normalization of markers of a chronic systemic inflammatory state [3], or the shift towards a normal pattern of fecal gut microbiota [4]. Furthermore, therapeutic modulation of gut microbiota has also proved to be effective in lean patients with NAFLD [5], maybe suggesting a role for gut microbiota independent of adiposity.

Finally, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) was also considered a therapeutic tool in NAFLD. Very intriguing results were reported in a trial in mice, showing the reduction of intrahepatic fatty accumulation and of proinflammatory cytokines [6]. Unfortunately, to date, evidence on the beneficial effects of FMT on humans is lacking.

In conclusion, we hope that gut microbiota modulation will be considered a therapeutic tool in patients with NAFLD, but more studies are needed.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare that there is no conflict of interest regarding the publication of this paper.

References

  1. X. Li and F. L. Yuan, “Comment on “Gut microbiota as a driver of inflammation in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease”,” Mediators of Inflammation, vol. 2018, Article ID 3746509, 2 pages, 2018. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  2. S. Bibbò, G. Ianiro, M. P. Dore et al., “Gut microbiota as a driver of inflammation in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease,” Mediators of Inflammation, vol. 2018, Article ID 9321643, 7 pages, 2018. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  3. N. Kobyliak, L. Abenavoli, G. Mykhalchyshyn et al., “A multi-strain probiotic reduces the fatty liver index, cytokines and aminotransferase levels in NAFLD patients: evidence from a randomized clinical trial,” Journal of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 41–49, 2018. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  4. E. Manzhalii, O. Virchenko, T. Falalyeyeva, T. Beregova, and W. Stremmel, “Treatment efficacy of a probiotic preparation for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis: a pilot trial,” Journal of Digestive Diseases, vol. 18, no. 12, pp. 698–703, 2017. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  5. F. Mofidi, H. Poustchi, Z. Yari et al., “Synbiotic supplementation in lean patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a pilot, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial,” British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 117, no. 5, pp. 662–668, 2017. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  6. D. Zhou, Q. Pan, F. Shen et al., “Total fecal microbiota transplantation alleviates high-fat diet-induced steatohepatitis in mice via beneficial regulation of gut microbiota,” Scientific Reports, vol. 7, no. 1, p. 1529, 2017. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar

Copyright © 2018 Stefano Bibbò et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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