Mediators of Inflammation

The Microbiota and Immune System Crosstalk in Health and Disease


Status
Published

Lead Editor

1Catholic University, Milan, Italy

2McGill University, Montreal, Canada


The Microbiota and Immune System Crosstalk in Health and Disease

Description

In the past decades, noncommunicable diseases have surpassed infectious diseases as the principal cause of disease and death in the world. Trillions of commensal microbes live in and on our body and constitute the human microbiome. Microbes reside in the gut, where they perform functions essential to our global health, including food intake and digestion, lipid accumulation, lipopolysaccharide content, insulin signaling, drug activation and metabolism, production of pleotropic dietary intermediates (short-chain fatty acids), and generation of anti-inflammatory mediators.

The gut microbiota plays critical physiological roles in the control of local or systemic immune responses to foreign or self-antigens and as such has become an increasingly important factor in the susceptibility to chronic inflammatory disorders, autoimmunity and infections, or effectiveness of various therapies. Disturbances in the gut microbiota are also involved in the pathogenesis of other various diseases in humans including metabolic disorders, cancer, psychological behaviours, gastrointestinal infections, inflammatory bowel diseases, systemic and organ-related autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes (T1D), and multiple sclerosis (MS).

Several evidences show that xenobiotics can positively modulate the complex inflammatory pathways at the site of gut mucosa, acting as anti-inflammatory agents. Xenobiotics may interfere with mucosal immune components, leading to an activation of anti-inflammatory pathways and inhibition of several mediators of inflammation. Studying the complex interplay between gut immunological components and xenobiotics will open new horizons in the knowledge and therapy of the inflammatory pathologies.

The nature of the microorganisms, their components, or metabolites that alter biological processes within and beyond the gut environment still remain ill-defined. Several strategies have been developed to change gut microbiota such as prebiotics, probiotics, or fecal microbiota transplantation, which have diverse effects on the body’s immune system and metabolism and turn on the development of disease.

The purpose of this special issue is to publish high-quality research articles as well as reviews that will stimulate the continuing efforts to understand the interactions between immunity and microbiota in health homeostasis and human pathologies.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Impact of xenobiotics and diet on the microbiota
  • Inflammatory disorders of various systems (e.g., intestine/gut, liver, and brain)
  • Autoimmune diseases (e.g., type 1 diabetes)
  • Opportunistic infections (e.g., clostridium difficile)
  • Immunosenescence
  • Obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes

Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2018
  • - Article ID 2912539
  • - Editorial

The Microbiota and Immune System Crosstalk in Health and Disease

Rossella Cianci | Danilo Pagliari | ... | Giovanni Gambassi
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2018
  • - Article ID 9191743
  • - Research Article

Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Columbianetin on Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

Junying Lu | Keyong Fang | ... | Fang Wang
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2018
  • - Article ID 7946431
  • - Review Article

Gut Microbiota-Immune System Crosstalk and Pancreatic Disorders

D. Pagliari | A. Saviano | ... | R. Cianci
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2018
  • - Article ID 9321643
  • - Review Article

Gut Microbiota as a Driver of Inflammation in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

Stefano Bibbò | Gianluca Ianiro | ... | Giovanni Cammarota
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2018
  • - Article ID 7026198
  • - Review Article

Gut Dysbiosis and Muscle Aging: Searching for Novel Targets against Sarcopenia

Anna Picca | Francesca Fanelli | ... | Emanuele Marzetti
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 7461426
  • - Research Article

Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth Affects the Responsiveness to Colchicine in Familial Mediterranean Fever

E. Verrecchia | L. L. Sicignano | ... | R. Manna
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 5230374
  • - Review Article

The Role of High-Mobility Group Box-1 and Its Crosstalk with Microbiome in Rheumatoid Arthritis

Federico Biscetti | Andrea Flex | ... | Gianfranco Ferraccioli
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 5095293
  • - Review Article

Skin Immune Landscape: Inside and Outside the Organism

Florence Abdallah | Lily Mijouin | Chantal Pichon
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 8390595
  • - Review Article

The Intricate Link among Gut “Immunological Niche,” Microbiota, and Xenobiotics in Intestinal Pathology

Danilo Pagliari | Giovanni Gambassi | ... | Rossella Cianci
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2017
  • - Article ID 5650627
  • - Clinical Study

Evidences of a New Psychobiotic Formulation on Body Composition and Anxiety

Carmela Colica | Ennio Avolio | ... | Laura Di Renzo
Mediators of Inflammation
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate41%
Submission to final decision77 days
Acceptance to publication36 days
CiteScore3.570
Impact Factor3.545
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