Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Mobile Information Systems
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 520572, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/520572
Research Article

An Adapted Wayfinding System for Pedestrians with Cognitive Disabilities

Department of Computer Engineering, Autonomous University of Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain

Received 9 June 2015; Revised 8 September 2015; Accepted 27 September 2015

Academic Editor: Dik Lun Lee

Copyright © 2015 Javier Gomez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. E. Foulke, “Perception, cognition and the mobility of blind pedestrians,” in Spatial Abilities: Development and Physiological Foundations, pp. 55–76, Academic Press, New York, NY, USA, 1982. View at Google Scholar
  2. K. Lynch, The Image of the City, vol. 11, MIT Press, 1960.
  3. D. R. Montello and C. Sas, “Human factors of wayfinding in navigation,” in International Encyclopedia of Ergonomics and Human Factors, pp. 2003–2008, CRC Press, Taylor & Francis, 2006. View at Google Scholar
  4. J. M. Loomis, R. L. Klatzky, R. G. Golledge, and J. W. Philbeck, “Human navigation by path integration,” in Wayfinding Behavior: Cognitive Mapping and Other Spatial Processes, pp. 125–151, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md, USA, 1999. View at Google Scholar
  5. H. Mengue-Topio, Y. Courbois, E. K. Farran, and P. Sockeel, “Route learning and shortcut performance in adults with intellectual disability: a study with virtual environments,” Research in Developmental Disabilities, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 345–352, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. S. E. Stock, D. K. Davies, M. L. Wehmeyer, and Y. Lachapelle, “Emerging new practices in technology to support independent community access for people with intellectual and cognitive disabilities,” NeuroRehabilitation, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 261–269, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. R. Hervás, J. Bravo, and J. Fontecha, “An assistive navigation system based on augmented reality and context awareness for people with mild cognitive impairments,” IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 368–374, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. H. Holone, G. Misund, and H. Holmstedt, “Users are doing it for themselves: pedestrian navigation with user generated content,” in Proceedings of the International Conference on Next Generation Mobile Applications, Services and Technologies (NGMAST '07), pp. 92–99, September 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. M. Rispoli, W. Machalicek, and R. Lang, “Assistive technology for people with acquired brain injury,” in Assistive Technologies for People with Diverse Abilities, Autism and Child Psychopathology Series, pp. 21–52, Springer, New York, NY, USA, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  10. A. K. Beeharee and A. Steed, “A natural wayfinding exploiting photos in pedestrian navigation systems,” in Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services (MobileHCI '06), pp. 81–88, Espoo, Finland, September 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. S. Fickas, M. Sohlberg, and P.-F. Hung, “Route-following assistance for travelers with cognitive impairments: a comparison of four prompt modes,” International Journal of Human Computer Studies, vol. 66, no. 12, pp. 876–888, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. A. L. Liu, H. Hile, G. Borriello et al., “Customizing directions in an automated wayfinding system for individuals with cognitive impairment,” in Proceedings of the 11th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility (ASSETS '09), pp. 27–34, Pittsburgh, Pa, USA, October 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. R. Lemoncello, M. Moore Sohlberg, and S. Fickas, “How best to orient travellers with acquired brain injury: a comparison of three directional prompts,” Brain Injury, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 541–549, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. H. Kaminoyama, T. Matsuo, F. Hattori, K. Susami, N. Kuwahara y, and S. Abe, “Walk navigation system using photographs for people with dementia,” in Human Interface and the Management of Information. Interacting in Information Environments, vol. 4558 of Lecture Notes in Computer Science, pp. 1039–1049, Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2007. View at Google Scholar
  15. A. G. García de Marina, R. M. Carro, and P. Haya, “Where should I go?: guiding users with cognitive limitations through mobile devices outdoors,” in Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Interacción Persona-Ordenador, Elche, Spain, October 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. S. Fickas, R. Lemoncello, and M. Sohlberg, “Where am I: how travelers with a cognitive impairment ask for and use help,” in Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on User Modeling and Adaptation for Daily Routines: Providing Assistance to People with Special and Specific Needs, pp. 5–18, Hawaii, Hawaii, USA, June 2010.
  17. N. Fallah, I. Apostolopoulos, K. Bekris, and E. Folmer, “Indoor human navigation systems: a survey,” Interacting with Computers, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 21–33, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. M. G. Friedman and D. N. Bryen, “Web accessibility design recommendations for people with cognitive disabilities,” Technology and Disability, vol. 19, no. 4, pp. 205–212, 2007. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. J. Gomez and T. Ojala, “A mobile navigation system based on visual cues for pedestrians with cognitive disabilities,” in Assistive Technologies for Physical and Cognitive Disabilities, pp. 173–190, 2014. View at Google Scholar
  20. K.-F. Richter and M. Duckham, “Simplest instructions: finding easy-to-describe routes for navigation,” in Geographic Information Science, pp. 274–289, Springer, 2008. View at Google Scholar
  21. J. Goodman, S. A. Brewster, and P. Gray, “How can we best use landmarks to support older people in navigation?” Behaviour & Information Technology, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 3–20, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. K. Rassmus-Gröhn and C. Magnusson, “Finding the way home-supporting wayfinding for older users with memory problems,” in Proceedings of the 8th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Fun, Fast, Foundational (NordiCHI '14), pp. 247–255, October 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus