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Mobile Information Systems
Volume 2018, Article ID 5950732, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/5950732
Research Article

A Sun Path Observation System Based on Augment Reality and Mobile Learning

1Institute of Learning Sciences and Technologies, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan
2Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan, Taiwan

Correspondence should be addressed to Kuo-Liang Ou; wt.ude.uhtn.dn.liam@uolk

Received 19 October 2017; Revised 26 January 2018; Accepted 8 February 2018; Published 29 March 2018

Academic Editor: Jesus Fontecha

Copyright © 2018 Wernhuar Tarng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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