Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Mathematical Problems in Engineering
Volume 2018, Article ID 2685709, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/2685709
Research Article

DEM Investigation of Particle-Scale Mechanical Properties of Frozen Soil Based on the Nonlinear Microcontact Model Incorporating Rolling Resistance

1School of Civil Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Heilongjiang, Harbin 150090, China
2Institute of Engineering Mechanics, China Earthquake Administration, Heilongjiang, Harbin 150080, China
3School of Transportation Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Heilongjiang, Harbin 150090, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Lingshi An; moc.361@ihsgnilnave

Received 28 August 2017; Revised 27 December 2017; Accepted 3 January 2018; Published 5 February 2018

Academic Editor: Antonio Bilotta

Copyright © 2018 Lingshi An et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Although frozen soil is in nature the discrete material, it is generally treated as the continuum material. The mechanical properties of frozen soil are so complex to describe adequately by conventional continuum mechanics method. In this study, the nonlinear microcontact model incorporating rolling resistance is proposed to investigate the particle-scale mechanical properties of frozen soil. The failure mechanism of frozen soil is explicated based on the evolution of contact force chains and propagation of microcracks. In addition, the effects of contact stiffness ratio and friction coefficient on stress-strain curve and energy evolution are evaluated. The results show that the nonlinear microcontact model incorporating rolling resistance can better describe the experimental data. At a higher axial strain, the contact force chains near shear band which can give rise to the soil arch effect rotate away from the shear band inclination but not so much as to become perpendicular to it. The propagation of microcracks can be divided into two phases. The stress-strain curve is strongly influenced by contact stiffness ratio. In addition, friction coefficient does not significantly affect the initial tangential modulus. Compared with frictional coefficient, the effect of contact stiffness ratio on stress-strain curve and energy evolution is greater.