Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Malaria Research and Treatment
Volume 2017, Article ID 9761289, 5 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9761289
Research Article

Monitoring Compliance and Acceptability of Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Malaria Using Sulfadoxine Pyrimethamine after Ten Years of Implementation in Tanzania

College of Natural and Applied Sciences, University of Dar es Salaam, P.O. Box 35064, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Correspondence should be addressed to Winifrida B. Kidima; zt.ca.msdu@wamidik

Received 17 September 2016; Revised 6 February 2017; Accepted 19 March 2017; Published 30 March 2017

Academic Editor: Kwadwo Koram

Copyright © 2017 Mdetele B. Ayubu and Winifrida B. Kidima. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. I. I. Daud, F. O. Opinya, D. Midem et al., “Improved pregnancy outcomes in a prospective study of pregnant women enrolling in an antenatal clinic in Western Kenya,” Health, vol. 6, no. 19, pp. 2651–2656, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  2. D. Mosha, J. Chilongola, R. Ndeserua, F. Mwingira, and B. Genton, “Effectiveness of intermittent preventive treatment with sulfadoxine–pyrimethamine during pregnancy on placental malaria, maternal anaemia and birthweight in areas with high and low malaria transmission intensity in Tanzania,” Tropical Medicine and International Health, vol. 19, no. 9, pp. 1048–1056, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. S. Gies, S. O. Coulibaly, F. T. Ouattara, and U. D'Alessandro, “Individual efficacy of intermittent preventive treatment with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in primi- and secundigravidae in rural Burkina Faso: impact on parasitaemia, anaemia and birth weight,” Tropical Medicine and International Health, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 174–182, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. L. Hommerich, C. Von Oertzen, G. Bedu-Addo et al., “Decline of placental malaria in southern Ghana after the implementation of intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy,” Malaria Journal, vol. 6, article 144, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. V. N. Orish, O. S. Onyeabor, J. N. Boampong et al., “Prevalence of intermittent preventive treatment with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTp-Sp) use during pregnancy and other associated factors in Sekondi-Takoradi, Ghana,” African Health Sciences, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 1087–1096, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. E. Arinaitwe, V. Ades, A. Walakira et al., “Intermittent preventive therapy with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine for malaria in pregnancy: a cross-sectional study from Tororo, Uganda,” PLoS ONE, vol. 8, no. 9, Article ID e73073, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. WHO Malaria Policy Advisory Committee and Secretariat, “Malaria Policy Advisory Committee to the WHO: conclusions and recommendations of March 2013 meeting,” Malaria Journal, vol. 12, article 213, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  8. J. Crawley, J. Hill, J. Yartey et al., “From evidence to action? Challenges to policy change and programme delivery for malaria in pregnancy,” The Lancet Infectious Diseases, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 145–155, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. PATH, “Policies and actions for improved Malaria in Pregnancy efforts in communities,” Malaria in Pregnancy Stakeholders Forum Report, 2015. View at Google Scholar
  10. H. Survey and I. Survey, “Tanzania,” 2015.
  11. A. Exavery, G. Mbaruku, S. Mbuyita, A. Makemba, I. P. Kinyonge, and H. Kweka, “Factors affecting uptake of optimal doses of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy in six districts of Tanzania,” Malaria Journal, vol. 13, article 22, 9 pages, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. S. M. Kibusi, E. Kimunai, and C. S. Hines, “Predictors for uptake of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) in Tanzania,” BMC Public Health, vol. 15, article 540, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. G. M. Mubyazi and P. Bloch, “Psychosocial, behavioural and health system barriers to delivery and uptake of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy in Tanzania—viewpoints of service providers in Mkuranga and Mufindi districts,” BMC Health Services Research, vol. 14, article 15, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. N. Protopopoff, A. Wright, P. A. West et al., “Correction: Combination of insecticide treated nets and indoor residual spraying in Northern Tanzania provides additional reduction in vector population density and Malaria transmission rates compared to insecticide treated nets alone: a randomised control trial,” PLoS ONE, vol. 11, no. 1, Article ID e0146629, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  15. S. Bhatt, D. J. Weiss, E. Cameron et al., “The effect of malaria control on Plasmodium falciparum in Africa between 2000 and 2015,” Nature, vol. 526, no. 7572, pp. 207–211, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  16. L. Durnez and M. Coosemans, “Residual transmission of malaria: an old issue for new approaches,” in Anopheles Mosquitoes—New Insights into Malaria Vectors, S. Manguin, Ed., pp. 671–704, InTech, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  17. G. F. Killeen, “Characterizing, controlling and eliminating residual malaria transmission,” Malaria Journal, vol. 13, no. 1, article 330, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. T. Marchant, R. Nathan, C. Jones et al., “Individual, facility and policy level influences on national coverage estimates for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy in Tanzania,” Malaria Journal, vol. 7, article 260, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. F. J. Mpogoro, D. Matovelo, A. Dosani, S. Ngallaba, M. Mugono, and H. D. Mazigo, “Uptake of intermittent preventive treatment with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine for malaria during pregnancy and pregnancy outcomes: a cross-sectional study in Geita district, North-Western Tanzania,” Malaria Journal, vol. 13, no. 1, article 455, pp. 1–14, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  20. S. O. Akinleye, C. O. Falade, and I. O. Ajayi, “Knowledge and utilization of intermittent preventive treatment for malaria among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in primary health care centers in rural southwest, Nigeria: a cross-sectional study,” BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, vol. 9, article 28, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. G. M. Mubyazi, P. Magnussen, C. Goodman et al., “Implementing intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in pregnancy: review of prospects, achievements, challenges and agenda for research,” The Open Tropical Medicine Journal, vol. 1, pp. 92–100, 2008. View at Google Scholar
  22. A. Launiala and M.-L. Honkasalo, “Ethnographic study of factors influencing compliance to intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy among Yao women in rural Malawi,” Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 101, no. 10, pp. 980–989, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. S. Africa, Intermittent screening and treatment in pregnancy and the safety of ACTs in the first trimester, 2015.
  24. M. Desai, J. Gutman, A. L'Lanziva et al., “Intermittent screening and treatment or intermittent preventive treatment with dihydroartemisinin–piperaquine versus intermittent preventive treatment with sulfadoxine–pyrimethamine for the control of malaria during pregnancy in western Kenya: an open-label, three-group, randomised controlled superiority trial,” The Lancet, vol. 386, no. 10012, pp. 2507–2519, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus