Modelling and Simulation in Engineering

Modelling and Simulation in Engineering / 2007 / Article

Research Article | Open Access

Volume 2007 |Article ID 028456 | https://doi.org/10.1155/2007/28456

A. Benkrid, A. Benallal, K. Benkrid, "Real-Time Vocal Tract Modelling", Modelling and Simulation in Engineering, vol. 2007, Article ID 028456, 8 pages, 2007. https://doi.org/10.1155/2007/28456

Real-Time Vocal Tract Modelling

Academic Editor: Ewa Pietka
Received11 Mar 2007
Accepted30 Dec 2007
Published30 Mar 2008

Abstract

To date, most speech synthesis techniques have relied upon the representation of the vocal tract by some form of filter, a typical example being linear predictive coding (LPC). This paper describes the development of a physiologically realistic model of the vocal tract using the well-established technique of transmission line modelling (TLM). This technique is based on the principle of wave scattering at transmission line segment boundaries and may be used in one, two, or three dimensions. This work uses this technique to model the vocal tract using a one-dimensional transmission line. A six-port scattering node is applied in the region separating the pharyngeal, oral, and the nasal parts of the vocal tract.

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Copyright © 2007 A. Benkrid et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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