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Multiple Sclerosis International
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 167156, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/167156
Research Article

Serum Metabolic Profile in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

1Institute of Biochemistry and Clinical Biochemistry, Catholic University of Rome, 00168 Rome, Italy
2Institute of Neurology, Catholic University of Rome, 00168 Rome, Italy
3Department of Biology, Geology and Environmental Sciences, Division of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Catania, 95125 Catania, Italy

Received 10 January 2011; Revised 30 March 2011; Accepted 2 May 2011

Academic Editor: Axel Petzold

Copyright © 2011 Barbara Tavazzi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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