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Multiple Sclerosis International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 4960386, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4960386
Research Article

Which Environmental Factor Is Correlated with Long-Term Multiple Sclerosis Incidence Trends: Ultraviolet B Radiation or Geomagnetic Disturbances?

1Neuroscience Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan, Iran
2Department of Neurology, Sayyad Shirazi Hospital, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan, Iran
3Multiple Sclerosis Center, Golestan Hospital, Ahvaz, Iran
4Department of Internal Medicine, Sayyad Shirazi Hospital, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan, Iran

Correspondence should be addressed to Seyed Aidin Sajedi; moc.liamg@ydejas.rd

Received 11 April 2017; Revised 20 August 2017; Accepted 30 August 2017; Published 24 October 2017

Academic Editor: Bianca Weinstock-Guttman

Copyright © 2017 Seyed Aidin Sajedi and Fahimeh Abdollahi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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