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Neuroscience Journal
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 172614, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/172614
Research Article

Encoding into Visual Working Memory: Event-Related Brain Potentials Reflect Automatic Processing of Seemingly Redundant Information

1Department for Psychology, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Wallstraße 3, 55099 Mainz, Germany
2Disciplin of Psychology, School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Hogbin Drive, Coffs Harbour, NSW 2450, Australia
3Institute for Psychology, University of Leipzig, Seeburgstraße 14-20, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
4Biomedical Science, School of Medical Sciences, The University of Sydney, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Australia

Received 30 November 2012; Revised 7 April 2013; Accepted 7 April 2013

Academic Editor: Pasquale Striano

Copyright © 2013 Stefan Berti and Urte Roeber. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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