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Neuroscience Journal
Volume 2013, Article ID 948241, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/948241
Research Article

Subchronic Oral Bromocriptine Methanesulfonate Enhances Open Field Novelty-Induced Behavior and Spatial Memory in Male Swiss Albino Mice

1Department of Pharmacology, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, PMB 5000, Ogbomoso, Nigeria
2Department of Human Anatomy, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, PMB 5000, Ogbomoso, Nigeria

Received 10 August 2012; Revised 27 October 2012; Accepted 14 November 2012

Academic Editor: Carles Vilarino-Guell

Copyright © 2013 Olakunle James Onaolapo and Adejoke Yetunde Onaolapo. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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