Table of Contents
New Journal of Science
Volume 2014, Article ID 249056, 26 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/249056
Review Article

Cytolethal Distending Toxin: A Unique Variation on the AB Toxin Paradigm

Department of Microbiology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA

Received 25 June 2014; Accepted 12 August 2014; Published 25 September 2014

Academic Editor: Alejandra Bravo

Copyright © 2014 Joseph M. DiRienzo. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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