Table of Contents
New Journal of Science
Volume 2014, Article ID 390241, 27 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/390241
Review Article

Candida Immunity

Mucosal and Salivary Biology Division, King’s College London Dental Institute, King’s College London, London SE1 1UL, UK

Received 9 February 2014; Accepted 5 June 2014; Published 25 August 2014

Academic Editor: Mohd Roslan Sulaiman

Copyright © 2014 Julian R. Naglik. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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