Table of Contents
New Journal of Science
Volume 2014, Article ID 674684, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/674684
Review Article

Zingiber officinale (Ginger): A Future Outlook on Its Potential in Prevention and Treatment of Diabetes and Prediabetic States

Discipline of Pharmacology, School of Medical Sciences, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia

Received 3 March 2014; Revised 20 June 2014; Accepted 25 June 2014; Published 23 September 2014

Academic Editor: Eric Hajduch

Copyright © 2014 Basil D. Roufogalis. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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