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Journal of Neural Transplantation and Plasticity
Volume 3, Issue 1, Pages 35-38
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/NP.1992.35

Cytological Differences in the Localization of Glucocorticoid Receptor-Like Imnunoreactivity in the Normal and Transplanted Pituitary Pars Intermedia

1Centro de Estudios Endocrinos, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de la Plata, Casilla de Correo 455, La Plata 1900, Argentina
2Intstituto de Embriología e Histología, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de la Plata, Casilla de Correo 455, La Plata 1900, Argentina

Copyright © 1992 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Glucocorticoid receptor-like immunoreactivity (GCRI) was found in the normal pituitary pars intermedia (PI) when immunohistochemistry was used. Since in previous studies we described two kinds of cells in the denervated (grafted) PI, i.e., “light cells” (overactive cells which do not contain detectable melanocyte stimulating hormone) and “dark cells” (hypoactive cells which contain the hormone), it was decided to investigate whether different patterns of distribution of the receptors could be detected in the grafted gland when compared with the intact PI. Intact glands showed the receptors located in the nucleus. In transplanted glands, it was observed that light cells showed receptors in both the nuclei and the cytoplasm; on the other hand, dark cells displayed them in the nuclei only, as is the case in all cells of the normal PI.

We had previously interpreted dark cells as dopamine-indifferent, whereas light cells were considered dopamine-sensitive. The changes in the distribution of GCR after denervation by grafting, which only affected the light cells, support the view of other authors that GCR of. the pars intermedia are under the influence of dopamine and reinforce our opinion that dark cells are dopamine-indifferent