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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2007, Article ID 29821, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/29821
Research Article

Effects of Methamphetamine on Single Unit Activity in Rat Medial Prefrontal Cortex In Vivo

1Neuroscience Laboratory, Institute for Medical Sciences, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 443-721, South Korea
2Digital Biotech Corporation, Singil-dong, Danwon-gu, Ansan 425-838, South Korea
3Department of Neuroscience, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA
4Department of Psychiatry, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 443-721, South Korea

Received 13 April 2007; Revised 14 June 2007; Accepted 14 June 2007

Academic Editor: Donald A. Wilson

Copyright © 2007 Jinhwa Jang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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